IMPROVE WOMEN'S HEALTH

2014 Contraceptive Update

The 2014 Contraceptive Update is an archived webinar presentation that addresses the latest developments in contraceptive practice. Topics include: Contraceptive CHOICE Project, improving LARC uptake, and EC methods especially as they relate to obesity.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To describe interventions and outcomes of the Contraceptive CHOICE Project.
  2. To identify practice changes that can improve long-acting reversible contraception uptake.
  3. To understand the difference between EC methods, especially related to obesity.

Source:
Family Planning National Training Centers

Topics:
Healthy Weight
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning

Benchmarks:
Reproductive Life Plan

Contraceptive Fact Sheets

The contraceptive fact sheets were developed as a training tool for professionals who work with clients to increase their basic knowledge about birth control options. These materials briefly review how each method works, how to use the method, effectiveness, benefits, potential side effects or disadvantages, potential risks, and where a person can get the method (i.e., available without a prescription or requires a visit to a health care provider).

Source:
Family Planning National Training Centers

Topics:
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning

Benchmarks:
Reproductive Life Plan

Family Planning Basics

This web-based, interactive course is designed for staff to gain the knowledge needed to conduct basic family planning education and counseling. It is designed to be completed in approximately two hours and can be done at your office or your home, at your convenience.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the importance of client-centered care to quality family planning services.
  2. Describe reproductive anatomy and physiology.
  3. Describe key points for counseling clients about contraceptive methods.
  4. Describe how to discuss sexuality-related issues with clients.
  5. Answer basic questions about sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Source:
Family Planning National Training Centers

Topics:
Life Course Model
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning

Benchmarks:
Birth Spacing
Reproductive Life Plan

Interconception Care Toolkit

The Interconception Care Toolkit modules are designed to enhance users’ knowledge of interconception health related subjects. There are links to internet resources throughout the Modules to help you learn the content. There are questions and scenarios in each Module which will help you use the information you are learning. At the end of each of the Modules, you will be able to quiz yourselves on what you have learned.

Module 1: The Birds, The Bees, The Plan
Part 1 – Helping Your Clients Plan Their Futures and Their Families
Part 2 – Grasping the Basics of Reproduction
Part 3 – Considering If and When to Become Pregnant Again
Part 4 – From Plan to Action: Finding and Using the Right Contraception

Module 2: Weighty Matters: Understanding and Addressing Postpartum Weight Retention in the Interconception Period

Module 3: Chronic Diseases

Module 4: Poor Perinatal Outcomes

Learning Objectives:

By the end of Module 1 (Parts 1-4) you should be able to:

  1. Describe and address some of the common myths about reproduction and reproductive health
  2. Educate your clients about these myths to decrease risky behaviors
  3. Explain basic sexual anatomy and physiology for males and females
  4. Describe the main differences in how three types of contraception work
  5. Use this information to help your clients understand basic reproduction and that methods used to prevent unintended pregnancies may be different than those to prevent STI transmission
  6. Discuss the risks of unintended pregnancies and short interpregnancy intervals (IPI)
  7. Help your clients consider a reproductive life plan
  8. Discuss reproductive coercion and how it impacts reproductive decision making
  9. Navigate the website bedsider.org
  10. Explain key characteristics of the main types of contraception to your clients
  11. Understand and explain failure rates to clients
  12. Help women/couples choose an appropriate contraceptive method for their reproductive plan and their personal characteristics

By the end of Module 2 you should be able to:

  1. Describe recommended and excess maternal weight gains in pregnancy
  2. Define postpartum weight retention
  3. Identify strategies for discussing and addressing postpartum weight retention with interconception women
  4. Provide evidence-based weight loss/maintenance strategies and resources to your clients

By the end of Module 3 (Parts 1-2) you should be able to:

  1. Explain the differences between chronic diseases that predate a pregnancy and pregnancy conditions that may lead to chronic diseases in the future
  2. Discuss why both are important for a woman’s life course and the health of any future pregnancies
  3. Discuss why the interconception period is an important time to address chronic diseases
  4. Support self-management strategies to interrupt the progression of preexisting and developing chronic diseases

By the end of Module 4 you should be able to:

  1. Discuss major causes of poor pregnancy outcomes and who they are most likely to affect
  2. Discuss some of the common psychological and social impacts of poor pregnancy outcomes for women, partners, and other children
  3. Recognize normal and abnormal stages of grief
  4. Provide basic interconception guidance to women who have experienced one or more of several poor pregnancy outcomes

Source:
National Healthy Start Association

Topics:
Chronic Disease
Depression
EBP Implementation
Healthy Weight
Home Visiting
Life Course Model
Parenting Education
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning
STDs including HIV

Benchmarks:
Birth Spacing
Perinatal Depression Follow Up
Perinatal Depression Screening
Postpartum Visit
Reproductive Life Plan
Well Woman Visits

Life Course Nutrition: Maternal and Child Health Strategies in Public Health

Is your health agency interested in preventing chronic disease? There is growing evidence that nutrition and growth in early life—during pregnancy, infancy and childhood—has an impact on chronic disease in adulthood. When state and local public health departments take steps to ensure the nutritional health of mothers and children they invest in the future health of the communities they serve. This module, based on a life course framework, is designed to help public health leaders describe the role of maternal and child nutrition in population health and identify actions they can take to create equitable access to healthy foods and food environments By the end of the module you will be able to use the life course framework to design effective nutrition initiatives to improve population health.

Source:
PH Learn Link

Topics:
Chronic Disease
Life Course Model
Nutrition
Prevention

Benchmarks:
Well Woman Visits

Nurturing Trust: Addiction and Maternal and Newborn Health

Addiction is always a complex challenge, but when a woman using substances is pregnant, suddenly two lives are at stake. Despite the difficulty of the situation, people in a position to help can increase the odds of a healthy pregnancy and good birth outcome. That’s the underlying principle behind numerous efforts in the US to reach out to pregnant women with drug dependency and to integrate treatment for addiction with perinatal care.

Such models are getting more attention because of the current opioid crisis and an alarming rise in neonatal abstinence syndrome. We discussed three particularly promising initiatives with the innovators who developed them on the June 2 WIHI: Nurturing Trust: Addiction and Maternal and Newborn Health.

Source:
Institute for Healthcare Improvement

Topics:
Alcohol/Drug Services
Risk Assessment
Tobacco Cessation

Benchmarks:
Smoking Abstinence
Usual Source of Care

Supporting and Promoting Breastfeeding in Health Care Settings

Physicians and health care providers have a unique role in promoting breastfeeding and supporting a woman’s decision to breastfeed. This support begins during preconception care and continues through prenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and during ongoing care of the infant, woman, and the family. To provide this ongoing support, physicians and health care providers need to: Know the current recommendations for breastfeeding; Understand the benefits of breastfeeding, the physiology of lactation, and how to identify women at risk for lactation problems or with contraindications; Provide breastfeeding education to identify potential barriers and solutions, resources, local lactation counseling services, and breastfeeding support groups; Establish policies and procedures consistent with the “Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding” to improve breastfeeding practices in hospitals, clinics, and office practices.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program participants will be able to:

  1. Increase knowledge about breastfeeding and lactation techniques;
  2. Improve skills in assessing latch and nursing effectiveness;
  3. Enhance proficiency in lactation counseling during pregnancy, at delivery, and during the immediate and postpartum periods;
  4. Increase the percentage of women who meet their breastfeeding goals, and increase successful breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and duration.

Source:
University at Albany School of Public Health

Topics:
Breastfeeding

Benchmarks:
Initiating Breastfeeding
Postpartum Visit
Quality Improvement/Evaluation
Sustaining Breastfeeding

Teen Pregnancy Prevention: Application of CDC’s Evidence-based Contraception Guidance

The course provides an overview of the current trends in teen pregnancy as well as the efforts health care providers can make among teens to increase use of effective contraception according to the CDC’s Evidence-Based Contraception Guidance. Presented in May, 2014

Learning Objectives:

  1. Review the trends in teen pregnancy, sexual behavior and contraceptive use.
  2. Describe current contraceptive methods available to teens.
  3. Describe the current evidence-based recommendations about the safety and effectiveness of contraceptive methods for teens.
  4. Provide clinical preventive services to improve outcomes and quality of life.

Source:
CDC

Topics:
EBP Implementation
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning

Benchmarks:
Reproductive Life Plan

Women and ACA: How to Use Your New Health Coverage (Like a Pro)

For the first time, millions of women and families now have access to quality and affordable health coverage. Access to guaranteed health services is finally a reality, however knowing what’s covered and how to use health insurance can be confusing. Join our expert panel as they break down how health insurance works and answer your questions on how to access important benefits such as birth control, preventive services, and more.

Source:
Enroll America

Topics:
Insurance Coverage
Prevention
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning

Benchmarks:
Health Insurance

PROMOTE QUALITY

Family Planning Basics

This web-based, interactive course is designed for staff to gain the knowledge needed to conduct basic family planning education and counseling. It is designed to be completed in approximately two hours and can be done at your office or your home, at your convenience.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the importance of client-centered care to quality family planning services.
  2. Describe reproductive anatomy and physiology.
  3. Describe key points for counseling clients about contraceptive methods.
  4. Describe how to discuss sexuality-related issues with clients.
  5. Answer basic questions about sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Source:
Family Planning National Training Centers

Topics:
Life Course Model
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning

Benchmarks:
Birth Spacing
Reproductive Life Plan

Implementation of Healthy Maternity Policies

This webinar highlights successful strategies and best practices that have been implemented in the North Dakota and Nevada state health agencies to encourage breastfeeding and to help new parents return to work. In addition, Virginia describes how they work with businesses in their state to develop breastfeeding policies.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Provide an overview of ASTHO’s environmental scan of worksite wellness programs and policies in state health agencies
  2. Provide examples of how state health agencies can support and implement effective healthy maternity policies within their department.
  3. Provide examples of how state health agencies can support local business to develop and implement their own healthy maternity policies.

Source:
Association of State and Territorial Health Officials

Topics:
Breastfeeding
EBP Implementation

Benchmarks:
Initiating Breastfeeding
Sustaining Breastfeeding

Interconception Care Toolkit

The Interconception Care Toolkit modules are designed to enhance users’ knowledge of interconception health related subjects. There are links to internet resources throughout the Modules to help you learn the content. There are questions and scenarios in each Module which will help you use the information you are learning. At the end of each of the Modules, you will be able to quiz yourselves on what you have learned.

Module 1: The Birds, The Bees, The Plan
Part 1 – Helping Your Clients Plan Their Futures and Their Families
Part 2 – Grasping the Basics of Reproduction
Part 3 – Considering If and When to Become Pregnant Again
Part 4 – From Plan to Action: Finding and Using the Right Contraception

Module 2: Weighty Matters: Understanding and Addressing Postpartum Weight Retention in the Interconception Period

Module 3: Chronic Diseases

Module 4: Poor Perinatal Outcomes

Learning Objectives:

By the end of Module 1 (Parts 1-4) you should be able to:

  1. Describe and address some of the common myths about reproduction and reproductive health
  2. Educate your clients about these myths to decrease risky behaviors
  3. Explain basic sexual anatomy and physiology for males and females
  4. Describe the main differences in how three types of contraception work
  5. Use this information to help your clients understand basic reproduction and that methods used to prevent unintended pregnancies may be different than those to prevent STI transmission
  6. Discuss the risks of unintended pregnancies and short interpregnancy intervals (IPI)
  7. Help your clients consider a reproductive life plan
  8. Discuss reproductive coercion and how it impacts reproductive decision making
  9. Navigate the website bedsider.org
  10. Explain key characteristics of the main types of contraception to your clients
  11. Understand and explain failure rates to clients
  12. Help women/couples choose an appropriate contraceptive method for their reproductive plan and their personal characteristics

By the end of Module 2 you should be able to:

  1. Describe recommended and excess maternal weight gains in pregnancy
  2. Define postpartum weight retention
  3. Identify strategies for discussing and addressing postpartum weight retention with interconception women
  4. Provide evidence-based weight loss/maintenance strategies and resources to your clients

By the end of Module 3 (Parts 1-2) you should be able to:

  1. Explain the differences between chronic diseases that predate a pregnancy and pregnancy conditions that may lead to chronic diseases in the future
  2. Discuss why both are important for a woman’s life course and the health of any future pregnancies
  3. Discuss why the interconception period is an important time to address chronic diseases
  4. Support self-management strategies to interrupt the progression of preexisting and developing chronic diseases

By the end of Module 4 you should be able to:

  1. Discuss major causes of poor pregnancy outcomes and who they are most likely to affect
  2. Discuss some of the common psychological and social impacts of poor pregnancy outcomes for women, partners, and other children
  3. Recognize normal and abnormal stages of grief
  4. Provide basic interconception guidance to women who have experienced one or more of several poor pregnancy outcomes

Source:
National Healthy Start Association

Topics:
Chronic Disease
Depression
EBP Implementation
Healthy Weight
Home Visiting
Life Course Model
Parenting Education
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning
STDs including HIV

Benchmarks:
Birth Spacing
Perinatal Depression Follow Up
Perinatal Depression Screening
Postpartum Visit
Reproductive Life Plan
Well Woman Visits

Nurturing Trust: Addiction and Maternal and Newborn Health

Addiction is always a complex challenge, but when a woman using substances is pregnant, suddenly two lives are at stake. Despite the difficulty of the situation, people in a position to help can increase the odds of a healthy pregnancy and good birth outcome. That’s the underlying principle behind numerous efforts in the US to reach out to pregnant women with drug dependency and to integrate treatment for addiction with perinatal care.

Such models are getting more attention because of the current opioid crisis and an alarming rise in neonatal abstinence syndrome. We discussed three particularly promising initiatives with the innovators who developed them on the June 2 WIHI: Nurturing Trust: Addiction and Maternal and Newborn Health.

Source:
Institute for Healthcare Improvement

Topics:
Alcohol/Drug Services
Risk Assessment
Tobacco Cessation

Benchmarks:
Smoking Abstinence
Usual Source of Care

Smoking Cessation for Pregnancy and Beyond: A Virtual Clinic

Smoking Cessation for Pregnancy and Beyond: A Virtual Clinic” is an updated online training, based on the “Virtual Practicum” model. This program offers various learning tools, including:interactive case simulations and comprehensive discussions of the patient visits, mini-lectures on relevant topics from leading experts, interviews with real patients who have quit, a dedicated web site of pertinent links and office resources.

Source:
World 2 Systems (CDC)

Topics:
EBP Implementation
Tobacco Cessation

Benchmarks:
Smoking Abstinence

Supporting and Promoting Breastfeeding in Health Care Settings

Physicians and health care providers have a unique role in promoting breastfeeding and supporting a woman’s decision to breastfeed. This support begins during preconception care and continues through prenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and during ongoing care of the infant, woman, and the family. To provide this ongoing support, physicians and health care providers need to: Know the current recommendations for breastfeeding; Understand the benefits of breastfeeding, the physiology of lactation, and how to identify women at risk for lactation problems or with contraindications; Provide breastfeeding education to identify potential barriers and solutions, resources, local lactation counseling services, and breastfeeding support groups; Establish policies and procedures consistent with the “Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding” to improve breastfeeding practices in hospitals, clinics, and office practices.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program participants will be able to:

  1. Increase knowledge about breastfeeding and lactation techniques;
  2. Improve skills in assessing latch and nursing effectiveness;
  3. Enhance proficiency in lactation counseling during pregnancy, at delivery, and during the immediate and postpartum periods;
  4. Increase the percentage of women who meet their breastfeeding goals, and increase successful breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and duration.

Source:
University at Albany School of Public Health

Topics:
Breastfeeding

Benchmarks:
Initiating Breastfeeding
Postpartum Visit
Quality Improvement/Evaluation
Sustaining Breastfeeding

STRENGTHEN FAMILY RESILIENCE

Interconception Care Toolkit

The Interconception Care Toolkit modules are designed to enhance users’ knowledge of interconception health related subjects. There are links to internet resources throughout the Modules to help you learn the content. There are questions and scenarios in each Module which will help you use the information you are learning. At the end of each of the Modules, you will be able to quiz yourselves on what you have learned.

Module 1: The Birds, The Bees, The Plan
Part 1 – Helping Your Clients Plan Their Futures and Their Families
Part 2 – Grasping the Basics of Reproduction
Part 3 – Considering If and When to Become Pregnant Again
Part 4 – From Plan to Action: Finding and Using the Right Contraception

Module 2: Weighty Matters: Understanding and Addressing Postpartum Weight Retention in the Interconception Period

Module 3: Chronic Diseases

Module 4: Poor Perinatal Outcomes

Learning Objectives:

By the end of Module 1 (Parts 1-4) you should be able to:

  1. Describe and address some of the common myths about reproduction and reproductive health
  2. Educate your clients about these myths to decrease risky behaviors
  3. Explain basic sexual anatomy and physiology for males and females
  4. Describe the main differences in how three types of contraception work
  5. Use this information to help your clients understand basic reproduction and that methods used to prevent unintended pregnancies may be different than those to prevent STI transmission
  6. Discuss the risks of unintended pregnancies and short interpregnancy intervals (IPI)
  7. Help your clients consider a reproductive life plan
  8. Discuss reproductive coercion and how it impacts reproductive decision making
  9. Navigate the website bedsider.org
  10. Explain key characteristics of the main types of contraception to your clients
  11. Understand and explain failure rates to clients
  12. Help women/couples choose an appropriate contraceptive method for their reproductive plan and their personal characteristics

By the end of Module 2 you should be able to:

  1. Describe recommended and excess maternal weight gains in pregnancy
  2. Define postpartum weight retention
  3. Identify strategies for discussing and addressing postpartum weight retention with interconception women
  4. Provide evidence-based weight loss/maintenance strategies and resources to your clients

By the end of Module 3 (Parts 1-2) you should be able to:

  1. Explain the differences between chronic diseases that predate a pregnancy and pregnancy conditions that may lead to chronic diseases in the future
  2. Discuss why both are important for a woman’s life course and the health of any future pregnancies
  3. Discuss why the interconception period is an important time to address chronic diseases
  4. Support self-management strategies to interrupt the progression of preexisting and developing chronic diseases

By the end of Module 4 you should be able to:

  1. Discuss major causes of poor pregnancy outcomes and who they are most likely to affect
  2. Discuss some of the common psychological and social impacts of poor pregnancy outcomes for women, partners, and other children
  3. Recognize normal and abnormal stages of grief
  4. Provide basic interconception guidance to women who have experienced one or more of several poor pregnancy outcomes

Source:
National Healthy Start Association

Topics:
Chronic Disease
Depression
EBP Implementation
Healthy Weight
Home Visiting
Life Course Model
Parenting Education
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning
STDs including HIV

Benchmarks:
Birth Spacing
Perinatal Depression Follow Up
Perinatal Depression Screening
Postpartum Visit
Reproductive Life Plan
Well Woman Visits

VDH: Impact of Domestic Violence on Perinatal Health Outcomes (Project Connect Training Module 3)

This module, part of the blended learning series, Project Connect: Creating Futures Without Violence, covers the impact of domestic violence on perinatal health outcomes. Improving perinatal and birth outcomes are core goals for many home visitation programs. This module makes the connection between pregnancy and domestic violence including associated risk behaviors around the time of pregnancy that are associated with poor birth outcomes, low birth weight, interference with breastfeeding, and postpartum depression.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify at least three effects of domestic violence on women’s risk behaviors during pregnancy
  2. List at least two effects of domestic violence on birth outcomes
  3. Describe the connection between domestic violence and breastfeeding

Source:
CDC

Topics:
Breastfeeding
EBP Implementation
Intimate Partner Violence

Benchmarks:
Intimate Partner Violence

ACHIEVE COLLECTIVE IMPACT

Building Bridges Across the Professions: Promoting Successful Intraprofessional Collaborations

This keynote address will focus on how leaders can bring together diverse groups of people to tackle shared problems and achieve the common good.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Rationale for the importance of collaboration
  2. Advantages of collaboration
  3. Challenges of collaboration
  4. Appreciate the role of organizational structure and culture
  5. Model for collaboration

Source:
University of Minnesota

Topics:
Community and Organizational Partnerships
Community Engagement
Group Processes/Facilitation
Leadership

Benchmarks:
CAN Implementation

Effective Leadership for Healthy Communities: Concepts, Collaborations and Case Studies

This course will cover the fundamental concepts of collaborative leadership and clarify the multiple layers of influence that impact health. Participants will receive an introduction to the knowledge and skills needed to effectively guide diverse groups of people to find solutions to complex problems that affect them all. Collaborative leadership is an evidence-based field that has proven particularly effective in public health planning where multiple stakeholders have an interest. Course topics include the nature of successful collaboration, characteristics of a collaborative leader and a discussion of the collaborative leadership practices. An overview of a multiple-sector approach to public health provides a context for the collaborative leadership discussions.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Determine when and when not to use collaboration 2. Compare five levels of relationships: networking, coordinating, cooperating, collaborating, and competing
  2. Identify three reasons people and organizations collaborate
  3. Identify some of the challenges to collaborative leadership
  4. Explain the context for collaboration
  5. Define the nature of successful collaboration
  6. Explain the meaning and nature of collaborative leadership
  7. Compare leadership styles
  8. Differentiate between “leadership” and “leader”
  9. Define the six practices of collaborative leadership Identify different ways to build collaborative leadership skills

Source:
Michigan Public Health Training Center

Topics:
Community and Organizational Partnerships
Group Processes/Facilitation
Leadership

Benchmarks:
CAN Implementation

Effective Project Management

Overview of the need for project management, role of project management, phases of project management, project management elements, project team, project contract. Explains the value of project management – that it helps the project move more quickly while the work is being done – “go slow to go fast”. The program discusses the need for a project plan and the different types of project plans that can be used.

Learning Objectives:

1. Project content, logistics, deliverables
2. Self management
3. Coordination and Communication with others

Source:
California Pacific Public Health Training Center - UC Davis

Topics:
Community and Organizational Partnerships
Group Processes/Facilitation
Project Scope

Benchmarks:
CAN Implementation

Increasing Meaningful Partnerships between Families and MCH Partnerships

In this module, nationally recognized family leader and speaker, Ms. Eileen Forlenza addresses four critical strategies for increasing meaningful partnerships between Families and MCH Professionals. Anyone interested in issues around Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) will find this 30-minute leadership lesson incredibly insightful and helpful.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Professional Partnerships
  2. Create a shared vision
  3. Strengthen your foundation
  4. Explore innovation
  5. Demonstrate strong leadership

Source:
Maternal & Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute

Topics:
Community and Organizational Partnerships
Group Processes/Facilitation

Benchmarks:
CAN Implementation

INCREASE ACCOUNTABILITY

Clinical Outreach and Outreach Communication Activity (COCA) Zika Calls

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) host monthly “Clinical Outreach and Outreach Communication Activity (COCA)” Calls. Slides, transcripts, audio recordings, and web recordings from each call are archived. To date, five COCA Calls have focused on Zika:

  • January 2016: Zika Virus — What Clinicians Need to Know
  • February 2016: Update on Interim Zika Virus Clinical Guidance and Recommendations
  • April 2016: Updated Interim Zika Clinical Guidance for Reproductive Age Women and Men, Sexual Transmission of Zika, and the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry
  • August 2016: Updated Interim Zika Clinical Guidance for Pregnant Women and Data on Contraceptive Use to Decrease Zika-affected Pregnancies
  • August 2016: Zika Update: Clinical Laboratory Testing and Care of Infants with Congenital Zika Virus Infection

Source:
CDC

Topics:
Prenatal Care and Education

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Cultural Competence and Global Leadership

This program is targeted to a public health audience and covers some key definitions and concepts included in the Cultural Competence Continuum. It looks at changes in demographics and what it means in terms of health disparities for racial and ethnic minority populations. The program discusses the rationale for cultural competence and reviews research conducted during the last 30 years on cultural differences and global leadership. Participants will learn about:

Learning Objectives:

  1. Cultural Competence
  2. Changes in Demographics
  3. Health Disparities
  4. Rational for Cultural Competence
  5. Cultural Intelligence
  6. Intercultural Conflict Style and Strategies

Source:
Maternal & Child Health Public Health Leadership Institute

Topics:
Community Needs Assessment
Cultural Competence
Data Utilization
Health Equity

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Cultural Diversity, Health Disparities and Public Health

A primary aim of this course is to provide public health professionals with a broad overview of cultural diversity issues with a focus on race/ethnicity and gender. Health disparities, a major public health problem of interest, is discussed using cultural diversity as the conceptual framework for thinking about the role of the public health community and health policy solutions for addressing these issues. As a part of this process, course participants are exposed to introductory cultural diversity concepts. In addition, participants also have an opportunity to engage in critical thinking regarding the current social and health problems that impact the public’s health, particularly racial minorities.

Source:
N/A

Topics:
Cultural Competence
Health Equity

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Data Collection for Program Evaluation

The goal of this course is to teach you how to collect data effectively when evaluating your programs. The course is divided into several modules, located in the tabs along the top. We recommend completing this course in several sessions. The course uses a personal preparedness program in a county health department as the case example, but the information is applicable to gathering data in many types of public health programs.

Learning Objectives:

  1. List five data collection methods in program evaluation.
  2. Design a basic survey questionnaire.
  3. List two methods of selecting a survey sample.
  4. Describe key components in planning and conducting interviews and focus groups.

Source:
Northwest Center for Public Health Practice

Topics:
Program evaluation

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Diversity and Cultural Competency in Public Health Settings – Basic Level

The purpose of this course is to provide public health practitioners with the awareness and knowledge to incorporate diversity and cultural competency concepts, tools, and techniques into their daily work. It is expected that by the end of this course that each participant will be conversant in issues related to culture and health, health disparities, and community health models designed to close the gap in health disparities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To describe the demographic trends and epidemiological trends related to diverse populations in the United States and abroad
  2. To compare and contrast diversity and cultural competency in the public health context
  3. To identify a framework to design culturally competent public health care services for diverse populations

Source:
South Central Public Health Partnership

Topics:
Cultural Competence
Health Equity
Strategic Planning

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Economic Evaluation for Public Health

Evidence-based public health is a decision making process used to determine the best intervention strategy for a given problem, population and resources. This webcast will describe key components of economic evaluation and illustrate using economic evaluation analysis tools in prioritizing and implementing prevention and treatment strategies. The major types of economic evaluation will be discussed and differences among them will be highlighted. ROI as an economic evaluation outcome in public health will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe key components of economic evaluation in public health.
  2. Identify differences between types of economic evaluations.
  3. Describe Return on Investment (ROI) as an outcome of economic analysis.
  4. Use economic analysis as a tool in prioritizing and implementing prevention and treatment strategies.

Source:
Michigan Public Health Training Center

Topics:
Data Utilization
EBP Implementation
Program evaluation

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Evaluation Planning and Prioritizing: Stakeholders are Your Edge

In this webcast, Dr. Cecilia Hegamin-Younger will provide a presentation on ways you can engage your stakeholders from the beginning of your program planning process through implementation, map their concerns to program outcomes in your logic model, and thereby focus your program evaluation on specific priority areas.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the importance of considering all audiences for an evaluation.
  2. Discuss appropriate scoping activities to focus and inform the evaluation plan.

Source:
Michigan Public Health Training Center

Topics:
Community and Organizational Partnerships
Program evaluation
Project Scope

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Five Practical Strategies for Managing Successful Improvement Projects

You have a great idea for an improvement project to reduce infection rates at your organization. You and your team have created a meaningful aim, crafted a useful set of measures, and brainstormed several creative change ideas to test in the coming months. There’s support from leadership, energy from staff, and excitement around every corner. You’re ready to go!

Except for one thing — now you need to successfully manage the project.

Managing a quality improvement project is a critical skill for anyone interested in making care — and systems — better where they work. But for many in health care, project management is not a full-time job. In fact, there’s a sizable gap between coming up with a great idea for a project and guiding a team to successful, meaningful improvements. Bridging that gap is what we discussed on this WIHI.

Whether you’re about to manage your first improvement project or your 50th, whether you manage teams of four or teams of 40, this episode of WIHI will show you the strategies you can test and use immediately, examples you can share with colleagues, and valuable tools you can bring to your next quality improvement project.

Source:
Institute for Healthcare Improvement

Topics:
Group Processes/Facilitation
Project Schedule
Quality Improvement

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Implementing a Program Theory-Driven Evaluation

Provides an overview of the steps required to implement a program theory-driven evaluation. Steps include stakeholder engagement, describing the program, developing a logic model, focusing the evaluation, data collection, drawing conclusions, and using evaluation results.

Source:
California Pacific Public Health Training Center - UC Davis

Topics:
Data Utilization
Program evaluation
Project Scope
Quality Improvement

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

In the Know: Social Media for Public Health

This interactive webcast series from the CDC’s National Prevention Information Network (NPIN) is designed to provide the latest in social media to support public health success. Information is included as future broadcasts are announced and archived presentations are made available following the broadcast. Existing topics include: social media tools (e.g., Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr, Google+, YouTube, LinkedIn, SlideShare, and Twitter), gaming, mobile, measurement and evaluation, and social media planning. CPH and CHES credits are available.

Source:
National Prevention Information Network

Topics:
Communication

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Inspiring Evaluation Activities: Moving Awareness to Action

The training provides an overview of how to identify stakeholders, how to get buy-in, intended use of evaluation, types of data, and types of evaluation (formative, process, impact, outcome).

 Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify your level of readiness to conduct evaluation
  2. Name key components of evaluation activities
  3. Identify the next step in conducting an evaluation in your workplace

Source:
California Pacific Public Health Training Center - UC Davis

Topics:
Program evaluation

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session Five Data Collection

This session discusses the issues to consider when making decisions about data collection. It will survey the most common data collection methods used in the evaluation of MCH programs. Students will get to outline a data collection plan for the Child Wellness Program. NOTE: This session is part five of a six-course series.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Identify issues to consider when collecting data for program evaluation
  2. Describe the strengths and limitations of quantitative and qualitative methods used in program evaluation
  3. Discuss decision-making issues regarding the selection or design of instruments to measure outcomes
  4. Apply knowledge to outline a data collection plan for the Child Wellness Program

Source:
South Central Public Health Partnership

Topics:
Program evaluation
Quality Improvement

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session Four Outcome Evaluation

This session discusses the importance of outcome evaluation in establishing a causal link between an intervention and observed results. The first part of this session will focus on identifying proper outcome measures; the second part will focus on the different types of evaluation designs. Students will get to formulate outcome evaluation questions and identify an evaluation design for the Child Wellness Program. NOTE: This session is part four of a six-course series.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Define the purpose of outcome evaluation
  2. Identify and formulate outcome evaluation questions
  3. Identify selection of evaluation designs
  4. Describe most common bias to internal validity
  5. Apply knowledge to identify and formulate outcome evaluation questions for the Child Wellness Program

Source:
South Central Public Health Partnership

Topics:
Program evaluation

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session One Monitoring & Evaluation: What? When? Who?

This session provides an introduction to the monitoring and evaluation of Maternal and Child Health programs. The first part describes the different types of program evaluation and the context in which these types of evaluation are used. The second part discusses the role of stakeholders to ensure effective evaluation and proposes some strategies to ensure successful collaboration. Students will get to identify stakeholders for the Child Wellness Program. NOTE: This session is part one of a six-course series.

Source:
South Central Public Health Partnership

Topics:
Community and Organizational Partnerships
Program evaluation

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session Six Analyze and Disseminate Findings

This session provides an introduction to the monitoring and evaluation of Maternal and Child Health programs. The first part describes the different types of program evaluation and the context in which these types of evaluation are used. The second part discusses the role of stakeholders to ensure effective evaluation and proposes some strategies to ensure successful collaboration. Students will get to identify stakeholders for the Child Wellness Program. NOTE: This session is part six of a six-course series.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the three types of evaluation used in the implementation of a MCH prevention program
  2. Explain the rationale to involve stakeholders in MCH program evaluation
  3. Describe the key issues to consider when involving stakeholders
  4. Apply your knowledge to identify stakeholders for the Child Wellness Program and develop a stakeholders matrix

Source:
South Central Public Health Partnership

Topics:
Program evaluation

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session Three Process Evaluation

This session discusses the importance of process evaluation in understanding the context of program implementation. This session will introduce the Family Nurse Partnership program to illustrate process evaluation findings. Students will get to formulate process evaluation questions and indicators for the Child Wellness Program. NOTE: This session is part three of a six-course series.

Source:
South Central Public Health Partnership

Topics:
Program evaluation

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Introduction to Program Monitoring and Evaluation in Maternal and Child Health: Session Two Program Description and Logic Model

This session discusses the importance of needs assessments in informing program evaluation and guiding the formulation of realistic evaluation goals and objectives. The session will also introduce the logic model as a way to articulate the components of a MCH program. Students will get to develop a logic model for the Child Wellness Program. NOTE: This session is part two of a six-course series.

Source:
South Central Public Health Partnership

Topics:
Community Needs Assessment
Program evaluation
Project Scope

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Making Data, Policy and Politics Work for Public Health

This self-paced online course focuses on the important role of health-related data in formulating effective public health policy in the context of a political society. In a hands-on format, this course helps public health decision makers examine how public health stakeholders and policymakers can select appropriate data sources, use data responsibly, and represent important public health issues in a data-driven way. At the same time, the interplay of politics, public health, and health research is highlighted.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the importance of providing a scientific and data-driven foundation in policy making and goal-setting
  2. Locate appropriate and reliable sources of public health scientific and data information
  3. Interpret health-related data in a policy or political context
  4. Communicate research data findings to public health stakeholders
  5. Explain how to translate data into usable information Identify gaps in health research information

Source:
Michigan Public Health Training Center

Topics:
Data Utilization
Policy
Program evaluation

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Module 1 – Introduction to Quality Improvement for Family Planning

This 30-minute e-learning module is the first of a five-part quality improvement curriculum to build the capacity of Title X grantees to fulfill the QFP recommendation for family planning entities to “conduct quality improvement.”

By the end of the module, learners will be able to:

  • Define quality improvement as it relates to the QFP
  • Explain how quality improvement is different than quality assurance
  • Describe the four guiding principles of quality improvement

Source:
National Family Planning Training Center

Topics:
Quality Improvement

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Module 2 – Quality Improvement Methodologies: Using the Model for Improvement

This e-learning module is the second in a five-part quality improvement curriculum to build the capacity of Title X grantees to fulfill the QFP recommendation for family planning entities to “conduct quality improvement.”

By the end of this module, learners will be able to:

  • Describe three quality improvement methodologies that can be used to improve family planning services;
  • Use the Model for Improvement to conduct quality improvement;
  • Conduct Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles

Source:
National Family Planning Training Center

Topics:
Quality Improvement

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Module 3 – Data-Driven Quality Improvement

This e-learning module is the third in a five-part quality improvement curriculum to build the capacity of Title X grantees to fulfill the QFP recommendation for family planning entities to “conduct quality improvement.”

By the end of this module, learners will be able to:

  • Explain how data are used to guide quality improvement for family planning services using the Model for Improvement
  • List three types of measures for monitoring quality
  • Analyze and interpret quality improvement data

Source:
National Family Planning Training Center

Topics:
Quality Improvement
Reproductive Life Planning/Family Planning

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation

Supporting and Promoting Breastfeeding in Health Care Settings

Physicians and health care providers have a unique role in promoting breastfeeding and supporting a woman’s decision to breastfeed. This support begins during preconception care and continues through prenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and during ongoing care of the infant, woman, and the family. To provide this ongoing support, physicians and health care providers need to: Know the current recommendations for breastfeeding; Understand the benefits of breastfeeding, the physiology of lactation, and how to identify women at risk for lactation problems or with contraindications; Provide breastfeeding education to identify potential barriers and solutions, resources, local lactation counseling services, and breastfeeding support groups; Establish policies and procedures consistent with the “Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding” to improve breastfeeding practices in hospitals, clinics, and office practices.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this program participants will be able to:

  1. Increase knowledge about breastfeeding and lactation techniques;
  2. Improve skills in assessing latch and nursing effectiveness;
  3. Enhance proficiency in lactation counseling during pregnancy, at delivery, and during the immediate and postpartum periods;
  4. Increase the percentage of women who meet their breastfeeding goals, and increase successful breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and duration.

Source:
University at Albany School of Public Health

Topics:
Breastfeeding

Benchmarks:
Initiating Breastfeeding
Postpartum Visit
Quality Improvement/Evaluation
Sustaining Breastfeeding

Trauma Informed Early Childhood Services

The goal of this curriculum is to build New Hampshire’s capacity to provide trauma-informed early childhood services, including childcare, home visiting, early education, and health and mental health services. In doing so, we hope that you engage in trauma-informed care in your own setting and spread the message of trauma-informed care to cross-system partners. This curriculum is divided into four units which include an introduction to Trauma-Informed Early Childhood Services, and then cover the impact of trauma on young children in terms of their neurobiology and development, the screening and interventions used with traumatized children, and reflective practices used to work with caregivers and traumatized young children. Each of these units will help to build your capacity to provide trauma-informed early childhood care. As you complete each unit of the tutorial, you will be asked to submit an online assessment. At the end of Unit 4, you will be able to download a certificate of completion.

Unit 1: Introduction to Trauma-Informed Early Childhood Services

By the end of the unit, learners will be able to:

  1. Define a “traumatic event” for young children
  2. Explain 4 types of trauma
  3. Know the prevalence of trauma in young children
  4. Define trauma-informed care within the context of early childhood services
  5. Understand and value your role in helping young children impacted by trauma
  6. Explore your fears and your concerns about addressing trauma

Unit 2: The Impact of Trauma on Young Children: Neurobiology and Development

By the end of the unit, learners will be able to:

  1. Understand the basic structure and development of the brain as it relates to trauma in young children
  2. Recognize the behavioral signs of an overused fear or stress response system in young children
  3. Understand how sensitization and desensitization of the human stress response system may manifest in the behavior of a young child
  4. Explain the impact of deprivation and neglect on young children and how they may be represented in behavior
  5. Know the primary criteria for diagnoses frequently given to traumatized children
  6. Know the functional impairments often observed in traumatized children
  7. Understand the long-term impact of exposure to trauma on behavior and health outcomes
  8. Understand the role of implicit and explicit memory in trauma and relationships
  9. Understand the concept of neuroplasticity and resilience as it pertains to recovery from trauma

Unit 3: Screening and Intervention with Traumatized Young Children

By the end of the unit, learners will be able to:

  1. Understand the purpose of screening young children for traumatic exposure and symptoms
  2. Understand the limitations of screening measures
  3. Identify opportunities for screening
  4. Identify 2 screening measures for trauma in young children
  5. Know how to introduce screening measures to families
  6. Identify when a referral for mental health treatment is merited
  7. Describe 3 key intervention strategies for traumatized young children
  8. Understand the parallel arousal cycle and know strategies to manage arousal
  9. Appreciate and deploy strength-based approaches to avoid an over-focus on problems
  10. Explain trauma concepts to caregivers

Unit 4: Working with Caregivers and Traumatized Young Children Using Reflective Practice

By the end of the unit, learners will be able to:

  1. Understand the conditions necessary to engage in a reflective relationship
  2. Describe the reasons why reflective practice is important when working with traumatized young children and their caregivers
  3. Intervene in conversation in a way that demonstrates reflective practice skills
  4. Explain the importance of reflection to a caregiver, colleague, or supervisor

Source:
New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)

Topics:
Case Management/Care Coordination
EBP Implementation
Home Visiting
Parenting Education
Socio-emotional Development for Children

Benchmarks:
Quality Improvement/Evaluation